Chinese Students and American Students

Abstract

Intelligence quotient is the general cognitive ability of an individual along with the processing speed of his or her brain. Various groups or people and cultures have different beliefs and facts about the determinants of IQ and its subsequent significance on the success of an individual, academically and otherwise. Some of them that elicit significant debates are education, nutrition, and social consciousness. This paper discusses various case models that are aimed at testing the three parameters. As stated, it is expected that education is the most influential factor in the equation of IQ determination, followed by diet. Societal consciousness is a little contributor to the intelligence quotient.

Observation and Models

Critical Experiment One

It is going to be an experiment done to evaluate the relationship between education and intelligence. It is going to analyze if a regular presence of students in the learning institutions make them have a higher IQ. Students IQ will be checked when on summer holidays, and when they are at school. The experiment seeks to distinguish between the first model about textbooks and the second model that talk about diet-boosting smartness. If model one is true, then students from other European countries that have researched textbooks would be having smarter students. If model two is true, then we would expect to see more American students being smarter due to the increasing cases of people shifting to healthy diets in the US.

Critical Experiment Two

The next experiment is going to be one that seeks to establish the extent to which nutrition impacts on an individual’s smartness in varying societies.  It is to be conducted by comparing the intelligence quotient level of two different categories of students. The first group will be of students who solely feed on healthy meals while the others will be those who frequently take fast foods that are unhealthy. The task is to distinguish the second model of diet’s impact on smartness from the third model of social consciousness. If the second model is correct, I expect to see smarter students in countries that still have a stronger agricultural base such as South American nations. However, if the third model is proven right, we will anticipate seeing more intelligent students in countries that measure success using academic progress. Such nations include China.

Critical Experiment Three

The third one is going to examine if it is the social consciousness or high IQ that makes students have excellent performance. It will entail asking the learners personally what force drives them to succeed in school. The experiment seeks to distinguish between the first and third model. If the first model is to be true, then we would conclude that school performance is a good measure of IQ level. If otherwise, then we will believe that social consciousness is the factor that makes Chinese students smarter.

Description of the First Critical Experiment

This experiment seeks to establish the relationship between student’s intellectual quotient and their academic performance. The experience works on the assumption that academic performance greatly influences a student’s I.Q. The experiment will employ the use an intelligence quotient score to measure the independent variable which is the student’s intelligence. To determine the student’s IQ score, they will be presented with a pattern-matching and analytical test such as the Raven’s Progressive Matrices Test. The students will be presented will two set of tests one while at school and the other during the summer holidays.

The Independent and Dependent Variables

This experiment, therefore, implies that a student’s I.Q is dependent on their performance at school. Academic performance is thus the independent variable as it influences the level of a student’s I.Q. The level of I.Q, on the other hand, is the dependent variable that is depending on academic performance.

Operationalization of the Variables

The scores generated from the student’s tests will then be viewed as a representation of their intelligence. Students who score higher on the Raven’s Progressive Matrices Test are, therefore, assumed to have a higher IQ as compared to their colleagues with lower scores.

For the independent variable, the experiment will make use of the students’ average grade for the last two semesters. Academic success is always a measure of the students’ performance in the various subjects within a specified period. Therefore, the students who will have scored most A’s within the past two semesters will be deemed to be high academic performers. Students who are scoring few A’s, on the other hand, will be presumed to perform poorly in their academics.

The hypothesis for this experiment can, therefore, be stated as; excellent performance in academics can result in an increase in a student’s intelligence. From the hypothesis, it can be noted that performing well in school will increase a student’s intelligence. This statement implies that students who perform well in class tend to have a higher IQ as compared to their counterparts who perform poorly in their studies.

Findings and Results

Description of the Outcomes and the Models They Support

Judging from the hypothesis this experiment can have two possible outcomes. The first outcome which agrees with the hypothesis will prove that academic success indeed increases a student’s intellectual quotient. This outcome supports model one which implies that the content and depth of the textbooks used in schools contribute a lot to the performance and smartness of the students. This model measures the intelligence of the students in relation to the reading materials used in the learning institutions as well as their performance in class.

The second outcome which disagrees with the hypothesis will show that students who perform well in school do not necessarily have higher IQ’s compared to their fellows that perform poorly in class. This outcome means that a student’s IQ is not dependent on their academic success. This outcome supports the second model which maintains that a student’s intelligence is dependent on their diet.

Description of the Second Critical Experiment

The second experiment seeks to establish the relationship between an individual’s diet and their level of smartness. This experiment will reveal whether nutrition has any impact on a person’s IQ level. To measure the smartness level of the students, we will use their intellectual quotient level. The student’s intellectual quotient level, on the other hand, will be established by administering the Raven’s Progressive Matrices Test to the selected students from the two groups. The student’s diet will be evaluated to distinguish those who maintain a healthy diet from the ones that feed on fast foods. The students will then be divided into two groups of healthy eaters and fast food eaters.

The Independent and Dependent Variables

Since the experiment will be testing the effects of nutrition on student’s IQ, then student’s IQ is the dependent variable. Secondly, in this experience nutrition will be influencing the student’s smartness level thus making it the independent variable. The level of the student’s smartness is assumed to be dependent on their diet.

Operationalization of the Variables

To measure the dependent variable, the student’s Intellectual quotient score from the Raven’s Progressive Matrices test will be used as their measure of smartness. The independent variable, on the other hand, will be measured by assessing the student’s diet. Those students who take three meals a day that include; vegetables, fruits and a glass of water with every meal are assumed to maintain a healthy diet. Students who take less than three meals a day that mostly consists of junk food will, however, be presumed to maintain a poor nutritional diet.

The experiment, therefore, seeks to prove the hypothesis that students who maintain an extremely nutritious diet are smart. According to this hypothesis maintaining a healthy diet will boost an individual’s intellectual quotient. It also implies that students who feed on unhealthy foodstuff tend to have a lower IQ level and are thus not as sharp as their counterparts that feed on healthy meals.

Description of the Outcomes and the Models They Support

If the outcome of this experiment agrees with the hypothesis, then it will follow that the students who maintain a healthy diet have a higher IQ compared to their colleagues who heavily rely on fast foods. This particular outcome supports the second model which states that Chinese high school students have a higher intelligence quotient than the American ones due to the fact that the Chinese pay more attention to their diet. This model maintains that an individual’s smartness is greatly dependent on their nutrition. The model makes its assumptions based on the fact that diet plays a significant role in brain development.

The other outcome which disagrees with the hypothesis will show that diet does not influence a student’s smartness level. This outcome supports the third model that affirms that Chinese students study hard in school due to the social consciousness that success in studies is the only means of achieving a brighter future. This model, therefore, implies that social consciousness is the only factor that stirs students to aim for academic success which translates to them having a higher IQ.           

Description of the Third Critical Experiment

The third critical experiment seeks to establish the relationship between social consciousness and academic performance. This experiment will determine the impact of social consciousness on the students’ performance in school. The experiment will monitor the academic performance of the students for the previous semester and establish if their success from influenced by social consciousness. This experiment seeks to establish if the students that scored high grades during their last tests were pushed by the force of social consciousness to work extra work. The students will be interviewed to establish what motivates them to work extra hard in their studies. The experiment will include a scale which will be used to measure the extent to which social consciousness compels the students into obtaining an excellent performance.

The Independent and Dependent Variables

The third critical experiment seeks to establish the relationship between social consciousness and academic performance. This experiment will determine the impact of social consciousness on the students’ performance in school. Since social consciousness influences performance then the students’ performance is the dependent variable. Social consciousness, on the other hand, will be the independent variable as it is the one determining the students’ performance. Social consciousness is not reliant on the performance of the students.

Operationalization of the Variables

The students’ grades for the previous semester will be used to measure their performance. For instance, a student who scored A’s in a majority of their tests will be considered to have excellent performance. A student scoring only one A or none at all will is regarded as having performed poorly in class.

To measure the independent variable, the students will be expected to determine on a scale of 1 to 5 the degree to which social consciousness influences their performance in school. In the scale 1 will be interpreted to mean that social consciousness did not have any impact on the student’s performance. 5 on, the other hand, will mean that social consciousness was the force behind the student’s excellent performance. The hypothesis for this particular experiment, therefore, is that social consciousness significantly affects the performance of students.

Description of the Outcomes and the Models They Support

If the outcome of the experiment is such that social consciousness is proved to be the great force behind excellent performance among students, then the hypothesis is true. This outcome supports the third model that relates the common social consciousness of the Chinese that success in studies is the only way to achieve a better future with high performance among the Chinese students.

However, if the outcome of the experiment reveals that social consciousness does not influence the performance of students, then the hypothesis is proven to be false. This outcome supports the first model which upholds that the performance of a student is dependent on their IQ. This revelation, therefore, implies that school performance is a good measure of the student’s IQ level.

Expected Results from the Models Discussed

This experiment involves three parameters that are under investigation in relation to the Intelligence Quotient of an individual. They are education, nutrition, and social consciousness.  Some communities around the world have had the notion that the three factors affect someone’s intelligence either positively or negatively, depending on their interaction with them.

Intelligence quotient is defined as the score that an individual gets from a standardized test that has been designed to asses a person’s brainpower. It is a test of the human aptitude ability; meaning that it is the processing power of the brain in terms of calculations, cognition, and memory (Lynn & Vanhanen, 2002).

A person’s IQ is bound to be higher if their cognitive abilities and familiarity with certain knowledge is exposed to them. For instance, a person can hardly know what the shape of a hamburger is unless they have seen it before, regardless of whether he or she ate it. Therefore knowledge has a great impact on the general IQ of a person. Conversely, the intelligence quotient determines how fast an individual is bound to grasp new concepts, or remember old knowledge (Deary & Johnson, 2010). Therefore countries that prioritize high educational standards are likely to have higher mean IQ ratings than others with low literacy levels.

Certain foods are said to increase the intelligence quotient. They include those rich in fats and proteins (Daly, 2014). However, this component only affects children whose brain mass is rapidly growing. Poor diet during childhood has been linked to low IQ, which is longstanding throughout a person’s life (Gray, 2011). Therefore, it has no significant effect on people starting from the adolescence stage onwards.

Social consciousness is a great influence on a person’s academic achievement, but hardly does anything to improve or reduce an individual’s IQ. For instance, an individual’s ability to process and recognize things may not increase because he or she is forced by the societal expectation to excel. However, the individual may dedicate more time to study so that he or she can pass exams, in societies that equate success with academic excellence. Some students will perform better than others regardless of using lesser effort than them. Therefore, social consciousness may have an effect on emotional or social intelligence (CMC, 2014), but does not affect the intelligence quotient of an individual.

From the above discussion, it is expected that the outcomes of the experiments will show that education is the biggest influencer of IQ at any age, followed by nutrition during childhood. However, social awareness or consciousness has no significant impact on a person’s intelligence quotient. Therefore, the Chinese students are much likelier to have higher IQs compared to their American counterparts.